PerCom 2015 Panel

Date

     Thursday, March 26, 2015, 10:00 am - 11:45 am

 

Panel Topic

"Cyber-Physical Systems and Pervasive Computing: Overlap or Divergent?"

 

Cyber-physical systems represents a holistic approach to co-design cyber and physical aspects of networked embedded systems. Pervasive computing systems are built to seamlessly integrate computing into our everyday environments. How will the emergence of cyber-physical systems as a cross-cutting discipline impact the field of pervasive computing? How can research in cyber-physical systems and pervasive computing leverage the advancements and insights made in both fields? Will we see a convergence of both fields? Or are there fundamental differences that will keep them separate but interleaving fields of research? This panel brings leading experts in cyber-physical systems and pervasive computing to brainstorm about these important issues.

 

Moderators

Chenyang Lu
Washington University, USA)
Jiannong Cao
Hong Kong Polytechnic University

 

Panelists

David Corman
National Science Foundation, USA

Christine Julien
University of Texas Austin, USA

Lui Sha
University of Illinois Urbana Champaign, USA

Franco Zambonelli
Universita' di Modena e Reggio Emilia, Italy

 

 

Moderators Bios

 

    
Chenyang Lu
Washington University, USA
 
Chenyang Lu is the Fullgraf Professor in the Department of Computer Science and Engineering at Washington University in St. Louis. His research interests include real-time systems, wireless sensor networks, cyber-physical systems and Internet of Things. He is Editor-in-Chief of ACM Transactions on Sensor Networks, Area Editor of IEEE Internet of Things Journal and Associate Editor of Real-Time Systems. He also chaired premier conferences such as IEEE Real-Time Systems Symposium (RTSS), ACM/IEEE International Conference on Cyber-Physical Systems (ICCPS) and ACM Conference on Embedded Networked Sensor Systems (SenSys). He is the author and co-author of over 150 research papers with over 12,000 citations and an h-index of 50. He received the Ph.D. degree from University of Virginia in 2001, the M.S. degree from Chinese Academy of Sciences in 1997, and the B.S. degree from University of Science and Technology of China in 1995.
 

    
Jiannong Cao
Hong Kong Polytechnic University
 
Dr. Cao is a chair professor and the head of the Department of Computing at The Hong Kong Polytechnic University. He is also the director of the Internet and Mobile Computing Lab in the department. His research interests include parallel and distributed systems, wireless networks, mobile and pervasive computing, and fault tolerance. He has co-authored 3 books, co-edited 9 books, and published over 300 papers in major international journals and conference proceedings. He has directed and participated in numerous research and development projects funded by Hong Kong Research Grant Council, Hong Kong Innovation and Technology Commission, China’s Natural Science Foundation, and industries like IBM, Huawei and Nokia.

Dr. Cao is a fellow of IEEE, a member of ACM, a senior member of China Computer Federation (CCF). He served as the Chair of Technical Committee on Distributed Computing (TPDC), IEEE Computer Society (2012-2014), a vice chairman of CCF's Technical Committee on Computer Architecture (2004-2007). Dr. Cao has served as an associate editor and a member of the editorial boards of many international journals, including ACM Transactions on Sensor Networks, IEEE Transacitons on Computers, IEEE Transactions on Parallel and Distributed Systems, IEEE Networks, Pervasive and Mobile Computing Journal. He has also served as a chair and member of organizing / program committees for many international conferences, including PERCOM, INFOCOM, ICDCS, IPDPS, ICPP, RTSS, DSN, ICNP, SRDS, MASS, PRDC, ICC, GLOBECOM, and WCNC.

 

 

Panelists Bios

 

    
David Corman
National Science Foundation, USA
 
David Corman is lead Program Director for the Cyber Physical Systems program at the National Science Foundation. Dr. Corman has a broad range of research interests spanning many technologies fundamental to CPS application areas including transportation, energy, medical devices, and manufacturing. Dr. Corman has extensive industrial experience in the development, design, and manufacture of CPS systems including manned and unmanned systems. Dr. Corman received M.S. degrees in Systems Science and Mathematics and Mechanical Engineering from WUSTL. He received hD degree in electrical engineering from the University of Maryland.
 

    
Christine Julien
University of Texas Austin, USA
 
Dr. Christine Julien is currently an associate professor in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of Texas at Austin. She is a member of the Center for Advanced Research in Software Engineering and the Director of the Mobile and Pervasive Computing Laboratory. Dr. Julien graduated with her D.Sc. in 2004 from Washington University in Saint Louis. She earned her M.S degree in 2003 and her B.S. with majors in Computer Science and Biology in 2000 (both also from Wash. U.). Dr. Julien's research is at the intersection of software engineering and dynamic, unpredictable networked environments. She and her students develop models, abstractions, tools, and middleware whose goals are to ease the software engineering burden associated with building applications for pervasive and mobile computing environments. Her current work largely focuses around context-awareness and query processing for hyper-localized information sharing and discovery, using device-to-device communication links and edge cloudlet resources. This work has broad application to the Internet of Things and Cyber-Physical Systems.
 

    
Lui Sha
University of Illinois Urbana Champaign, USA
 
Lui Sha graduated from CMU in 1985 and is Donald B. Gillies professor at UIUC. He is an IEEE and ACM Fellow. He led the research on real time computing that transformed the industry practice and IEEE standards in real time computing. His work on complexity reduction and control architecture patterns makes formal verification of distributed real time systems scalable, e.g., the reduction of model checking from 35 hours to less than 30 seconds in a flight control prototype demonstrated by Rockwell Collins, winning the David Lubkowski Award for the Advancement of Digital Avionics. He successfully consulted on many National high-tech projects and was a member of National Academy of Science's Committee on Certifiably Dependable Systems, the review panel of NASA Langley's Safety Critical Systems Branch and the steering committee that helped launch the NSF CPS program. Recently, he works with FAA on certifiable multicore avionic architectures and with medical community on acute care guidance and control systems such as a prototype for cardiac arrest resuscitation demonstrated by Carle Foundation Hospital's ICU Director.
 

    
Franco Zambonelli
Universita' di Modena e Reggio Emilia, Italy
 
Franco Zambonelli is full professor of Computer Science at the University of Modena and Reggio Emilia. He got his PhD in Computer Science and Engineering from the University of Bologna in 1997. His research interests include: pervasive computing, multi-agent systems, self-adaptive and self-organizing systems. He has published over 80 papers in peer-reviews journals, and has been invited speaker at many conferences and workshops. He is the co-Editor in Chief of the ACM Transactions on Autonomous and Adaptive Systems, and he is in the Editorial Board of the Elsevier Journal of Pervasive and Mobile Computing, of the BCS Computer Journal and of the Journal of Agent-Oriented Software Engineering, and he is in the Steering Committee of the IEEE SASO Conference. He has been scientific manager of the EU FP6 Project CASCADAS and coordinator of the EU FP7 Project SAPERE. He is ACM Distinguished Scientist, member of the Academia Europaea, and IEEE Fellow.